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July 2014
29
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July 2014
29
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Remember that time I tried to give up coffee? …… lol.

#personal   #coffee   
July 2014
29
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  • ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST: 
  •  If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.
  •  (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
  • SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
  • UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
  • WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
  •  (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
  • MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
  • DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
  • WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
  • EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
  • WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
  • EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
  • WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
  •  (SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)
  • ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
  • AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
  •  (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
  • DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
  • WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
  •  (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
  • SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
  • WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
  • ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
  • WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
  • ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
  • EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
  • WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
  • EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
  • WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.
July 2014
29
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emt-monster:

source

emt-monster:

source

#a and p   #nurse   #nursing   #nursing school   #nclex   #usmle   #heart   #cardio   
July 2014
28

To all my health care workers,

Remember to take care of yourself as lovingly and wonderfully as you do your patients!

July 2014
25
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yneena:

WHEN TRYING TO DESCRIBE MY HOBBIES AND INTERESTS OUTSIDE OF NURSING AND STUDIES

yneena:

WHEN TRYING TO DESCRIBE MY HOBBIES AND INTERESTS OUTSIDE OF NURSING AND STUDIES

#funny   #nurse   
July 2014
25
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Behar, E., DiMarco, I. D., Hekler, E. B., Mohlman, J., & Staples, A. M. (2009). Current theoretical models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): Conceptual review and treatment implications. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23, 1011-1023.

Behar, E., DiMarco, I. D., Hekler, E. B., Mohlman, J., & Staples, A. M. (2009). Current theoretical models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): Conceptual review and treatment implications. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23, 1011-1023.

#psych   #psychology   #gad   #anxiety   #psychiatry   
July 2014
25

7 days in a row…..and go!
At least the pay cheque will be awesome.

#personal   #nurse   
July 2014
24

When my friends ask me if I’m going to get out of bed on my day off

#gif   #gif warning   #will ferrell   #day off   #lazy   #personal   #personal post   #nurse   #rn   
July 2014
23
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  • Alport’s Sd (most cases): "hereditary nephritis", type IV collagen deficit, mutation of COL4A5 ("colaas" - alpha-5 chain, type 4 collagen), hearing loss, ocular abnormalities (lens & cornea), hematuria since childhood (gross, micro)
  • Charcot Marie Tooth: loss of motor & sensory innervation, distal weakness & sensory loss, wasting in the legs, decreased deep tendon reflexes, tremor, foot deformity with a high arch is common (pes cavus), legs look like inverted champagne bottles. Most accurate test: electromyography. No tx.
  • Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: skin abnormalities and a wide variety of defects in eyes; teeth; and skeletal, urinary, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems.
  • Fragile X Syndrome: CGG trinucleotid repeat, FMR 1 gene mutation, mental retardation, large ears and jaw, post-pubertal macro-orchidism (males), attention deficit disorder (females)
  • Hypophosphatemic rickets: infants may show growth retardation, widened joint spaces and flaring at the knees at age 1 (> boys), bowing of the weight-bearing long bones, young children-dentition absent or delayed, older children-multiple dental abscesses.
  • Incontinentia pigmenti: skin abnormalities (blister--> warts--> hyperpigmentation--> hypopigmentation), alopecia, hypodontia, cerebral atrophy, slow motor development, mental retardation, seizures, skeletal & structural anomalies. Letal >males.
  • Orofaciodigital Sd: OFD1 gene mutation, malformations of face, oral cavity, digits with polycystic kidney disease and variable involvement of the central nervous system.
  • RETT’s Sd: sporadic mutation of MECP2 gene, onset 2yo, acquired microcephaly, stopped development, motor & speech regression, autism-like behavior, self-mutilating behavior, inconsolable crying/screaming fits, emotional inversion, hypotonia, dystonia, chorea, bruxism, scholiosis, long QT
#genetics   #biology   #reblog   #nurse   #nursing   #nursing school   #med   #medical   #med school   #pre med